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ΓΚΕΛΑΝΤΟ

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Δρ. ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΣ ΝΙΚΟΛΑΟΥ ΓΚΕΛΗΣ

Ωτορινολαρυγγολόγος
Δαμασκηνού 46, Κόρινθος - 20100
Τηλ. 27410 26631, 6944280764

www.gelis.gr
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Email: pharmage@otenet.gr


THE POSITIVE INFLUENCE OF NUTRITIONAL ALKALINITY ON BONE HEALTH

alt

Dr Dimitrios N. Gelis,

 MD, DDS, PhD,

Otorinolaryngologist

with special interest in

Medical Nutrition and

Complementary

Medicine, Korinthos,

 Greece.

   This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

www.gelis.gr,

 www,pharmagel.gr,

www.orlpedia.gr

www.allergopedia.gr

www.gkelanto.gr

altZacharopoulos Dimitrios,

 Pharmacist with special

 interest in Nutrition and

 Complementary

 Pharmacy

e-mail: 

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

The urine-acidifying properties of food constituents depend on their content of non-oxidizable acids or precursors. Acidifying constituents such as animal proteins may negatively affect calcium metabolism and accelerate bone resorption, thus representing an aggravating factor for osteoporosis[1].

There is growing evidence that consumption of a Western diet is a risk factor for osteoporosis through excess acid supply, while fruits and vegetables balance the excess acidity, mostly by providing K-rich bicarbonate-rich foods. Western diets consumed by adults generate approximately 50-100 mEq acid/d; therefore, healthy adults consuming such a diet are at risk of chronic low-grade metabolic acidosis, which worsens with age as a result of declining kidney function[2].


Deficiency of K-base in the diet increases the net systemic acid load imposed by the diet. We know that clinically-recognized chronic metabolic acidosis has deleterious effects on the body, including growth retardation in children, decreased muscle and bone mass in adults, and kidney stone formation, and that correction of acidosis can ameliorate those conditions[3].


Bone buffers the excess acid by delivering cations and it is considered that with time an overstimulation of this process will lead to the dissolution of the bone mineral content and hence to reduced bone mass. Intakes of K, Mg and fruit and vegetables have been associated with a higher alkaline status and a subsequent beneficial effect on bone health.

In healthy male volunteers an acid-forming diet increases urinary Ca excretion by 74% and urinary C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (C-telopeptide) excretion by 19% when compared with an alkali (base-forming) diet. Cross-sectional studies have shown that there is a correlation between the nutritional acid load and bone health measured by bone ultrasound or dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

Few studies have been undertaken in very elderly women (>75 years), whose osteoporosis risk is very pertinent. High acid load may be an important additional risk factor that may be particularly relevant in very elderly patients with an already-high fracture risk. The latter study adds to knowledge by confirming a positive link between dietary alkalinity and bone health indices in the very elderly. In a further study to complement these findings it has also been shown in a group of thirty young women that in Ca sufficiency an acid Ca-rich water has no effect on bone resorption, while an alkaline bicarbonate-rich water leads to a decrease in both serum parathyroid hormone and serum C-telopeptide.

Further investigations need to be undertaken to study whether these positive effects on bone loss are maintained over long-term treatment. Mineral-water consumption could be an easy and inexpensive way of helping to prevent osteoporosis and could be of major interest for long-term prevention of bone loss[2].


In summary the  renally excreted acids derived from food influence calcium metabolism, and that alkalizing nutrients inhibit bone resorption. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical impact of dietary counseling for avoiding diet acids as a preventive measure against osteoporosis[1]. 


References

1. Buclin T, Cosma M, Appenzeller M, Jacquet AF, Décosterd LA, Biollaz J, Burckhardt P. Diet acids and alkalis influence calcium retention in bone. Osteoporos Int. 2001;12(6):493-9.

2. Wynn E, Krieg MA, Lanham-New SA, Burckhardt P. Postgraduate Symposium: Positive influence of nutritional alkalinity on bone health. Proc Nutr Soc. 2010 Feb;69(1):166-73.

3. Frassetto L, Morris RC Jr, Sellmeyer DE, Todd K, Sebastian A. Diet, evolution and aging--the pathophysiologic effects of the post-agricultural inversion of the potassium-to-sodium and base-to-chloride ratios in the human diet.

Eur J Nutr. 2001 Oct;40(5):200-13.

Copyright: Dr Dimitrios N. Gelis, Md, DDS, PhD, ORL, Gkelanto, Dictionary of Health and Wellness, Korinthos 2010


Last Updated (Friday, 16 August 2013 22:06)

 
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